Tag Archives: ghost story

Deerbourne Inn Dates: Peggy Chambers

Today I’m talking to Peggy Chambers, author of 2 YA Fantasy Novels, 3 Adult Suspense Novels, 1 Adult Fantasy Novella, and 1 Adult Pulp Fiction novel. She is a contributing author to the Deerbourne Inn series and her book Witches’ Cliff  is out now.

What’s the first book you remember reading on your own as a child, or your favourite childhood read?

I remember the Dick and Jane books from grade school when I first started reading. I loved taking the newspaper my dad always read and picking out words I’d learned at school. My favourite books to read later in grade school were the Nancy Drew series.

What’s your favourite place to write?

I have an over-sized red leather recliner in the guest bedroom that used to belong to my father-in-law. It is too big for me, but immensely comfortable. In the room I am surrounded by family objects: my grandmother’s bed, a small table that belonged to my dad, pictures from my aunt, and a muse in the form of a drawn print from a friend I used to work with. All these things are comforting and inspiring.

What’s the most important lesson you have learned on your writing journey so far?

Keep learning. You can never learn all there is about writing. I love to learn what other writers do and try it in my own writing.

What do you do when you feel stuck?

Like most writers, I get stuck in the middle of the story. I always know how it starts and where it is going. The middle of the story is more difficult. When I get stuck, I write a different section of the story, leave it at the bottom of the manuscript and eventually it will go in the right place.

Writers are readers too. Please recommend a romance you recently read and enjoyed.

I love the Outlander series by Diana Gabledon, but I recently read three romance novellas in the Deerbourne Inn series, Hope’s Dream by Peggy Jaeger, Soul of the Storm by Jean M. Grant, and Lyrical Embrace by Amber Daulton. I highly recommend them – a short read with a powerful story.

What was it that appealed to you about the Deerbourne Inn series?

I love a quaint inn. I’ve never been to Vermont, though it is on my bucket list, but the setting at the inn on Halloween made me think of witches and then the Salem Witch Trials that took place near the area. It made for the perfect backdrop for a story. Also, the Wild Rose Press has some impressive authors in their stable. I wanted to get to know them and be associated with them as people and authors.

What was the inspiration behind Witches’ Cliff?

WitchesCliff_w13159_750I chose the holiday of Halloween because I thought most of the stories would be set at Christmas. As I said, Halloween made me think of witches and I started to research the Salem Witch Trails. The story took off from there.  I don’t write historical novels, so I set it in the present and included a visit from a ghost who knew about the witch trials of Willow Springs.

Tell us about Witches’ Cliff  in 150 words or less.

In 1692 Salem, Massachusetts held the witch trials and many innocent women died. During that same dark time the tiny town of Willow Springs, Vermont had their own slaughter at a local cliff. Penny Winter’s ancestor was one of those witches.

Years later Penny’s mother moved to Salem with her new baby to avoid the long memories of her neighbors. Penny learned the wiccan ways from her mother and became a professor of history at a local university. And then she met Jeff.

With no relatives to depend upon, Penny returns to the town where her grandmother died to seek her opinion of the man who has asked her to marry him. She once again encounters a Willow Springs witch. It’s Halloween and Penny desperately needs to talk to her ancestor before she marries, and it has to be at the cliff where grandma died. But she is not alone.

Do you have an extract you can share with us?

Appearing from nowhere, the elderly woman, in a tattered dark dress stood in the middle of the road.  Her wild hair strung with branches like she had fallen in the forest before stumbling onto the highway.

Swerving to a stop on the side of the road, Penny threw open the door. Jumping from the car she raced back where the woman had been – and stood in the middle of the road turning around.

No one was there.

She spun in a circle three times, searching the woods beside the road for the woman. Where could she have disappeared? The woman was there – Penny saw her. But no one could be found in the area, now.

A horn blasted behind her making Penny jump and twist around.  The semi barrelled down the highway and she leapt out of the way, running for her car.  That was real, and much too close.

“Go home.” The voice whispered in her ear. And once again Penny spun around.

Buy link: https://tinyurl.com/y3fktu44

Where can readers find you online? 

My website is located at http://peggylchambers.wordpress.com/ where I write a weekly blog. You can like me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BraWars, connect with me on Twitter at @ChambersPeggy, or on Instagram at champeggy.

Thanks for stopping by Peggy. I’m intrigued to read Witches’ Cliff and I LOVE your cover.

Deerbourne Inn Dates

Today I’m talking to Julie Howard, author of three mysteries, Crime and ParadiseCrime Times Two, and recently Spirited Quest. She is a contributing author to the Deerbourne Inn series. Spirited Quest is available now.

What’s the first book you remember reading on your own as a child, or your favorite childhood read?

I started reading very early, at age three. My parents even started me in a private kindergarten a couple of weeks before I turned four because of this. I don’t remember what that first book would have been – most likely Dr. Seuss – but my favorite childhood read was My Friend Flicka.

I had a huge horse crush as a girl, and probably read Black Beautyfifty times. All through school, I was in the library every Saturday as soon as it opened and carried out an armload of books.

What’s your favorite place to write?

In cafes! I love the buzz of conversation around me as I write. I think this goes back to my days as a newspaper reporter and editor, working in a bustling newsroom where people moved about, TVs were on, and even arguments broke out. I can shut out almost any noise, but I find it difficult to write in complete silence.

What’s the most important lesson you have learned on your writing journey so far?

Never give up. And never give up on yourself. Writing and getting published isn’t easy. I have much more admiration of writers now that I’m published and understand a bit of what they’ve been through too. I don’t get discouraged easily and the early rejections didn’t stop me. In fact, they urged me on and prompted me to get better. Sort of like “Oh, you didn’t like this? Let me try again.”

What do you do when you feel stuck?

I’m a big believer in outlining my books and this helps enormously in not running into writer’s block. Every once in a while, however, I hit a spot where the plot just isn’t working, and I do get stuck. At that point, I move on to another scene later in the book. Usually, by the time I’m done with another scene, a resolution comes to me for the earlier scene I was stuck on. If not, I just keep moving forward. I never let myself stop writing.

Writers are readers too. Please recommend a romance you recently read and enjoyed.

I loved The Golem and the Jinii by Helene Wecker. This isn’t your ordinary romance since the characters aren’t human (and Golems aren’t technically alive) and it’s more a romance of the heart than the body. It’s a great story and so well-written. I’m anxiously awaiting the author’s next book.

What was it that appealed to you about the Deerbourne Inn series?SpiritedQuest_w13051_750

To be honest, I’m surprised I ended up writing for the Deerbourne Inn series at all. I didn’t know if I could write a good short mystery. But once I learned there was a ghost at the Deerbourne Inn, the plot came to me in a flash. All of a sudden I HAD to write the story. It was as though the ghost haunted me until I wrote about her. Now I’m hooked on writing shorter novels and would love to write more of them.

What was the inspiration behind Spirited Quest?

Since childhood, one of my favorite types of books to read has been magical realism. It was just a matter of time before I sat down to write a ghost story. I’m so glad I had the opportunity to write this one. I’ve always believed there was something behind the closet door and under the bed, but these days I’m not afraid of them.

Tell us about Spirited Quest in 100 words or less.

My main character, Paige Norman, believes in a tangible, explainable world. When her ghost-hunting niece comes for a visit, she tries not to scoff. But someone, or something, is stirring up trouble at the Deerbourne Inn and her niece, Jillian, is at the center of the mystery. Paige is certain the handsome Aussie photographer is behind unexplained disturbances. Meanwhile, Jillian gets to know the spirit of the Deerbourne, who foretells an encounter with “two men.” Then the pranks turn dangerous. Has her niece attracted a stalker or has she conjured up evil? Can the culprit be the man who has captured her heart?

Do you have an extract you can share with us?

He nodded a friendly greeting to her, his gaze grazing past to include others on the porch. “G’day, ma’am. G’day all.”

An Australian. Her heart skipped a beat. Oh, to be twenty-five, even thirty-five, again. His gaze settled on her niece, and as always happened to men where this girl was concerned, his jaw slackened, then tightened.

Next to her, Jillian grew still, lifting wide blue eyes to the newcomer. The moment passed. He was through the front door and into the lobby, and the door closed behind him.

“You’re in for some nice company this week,” Paige commented with a smile.

A frown flickered across her niece’s face. “I’ve seen him before.”

“You’ve met?”

“Not exactly. He appeared to me in a dream.” Jillian’s blue eyes were troubled as she gazed at the Inn’s front door. She lifted one hand and rubbed the back of her head, then gave a shiver. “There was blood and I was afraid.”

Buy links

Julie Howard pix.jpg

Where can readers find you online?